Programmer Fast Track in Atomic Scala

We wrote Atomic Scala to appeal to beginning programmers as well as experienced programmers who have been frustrated with the sharp learning curve often described when learning Scala. In the atom “How to Use This Book”, we encourage experienced programmers to move through the material more quickly by skipping to the summaries (Summary 1 and Summary 2). Those summaries also help beginners by reinforcing the information that we previously presented in detailed atoms and with additional exercises.

If you previously downloaded the free sample, go ahead and grab another copy. The first 100 pages of the book (free download) has now been updated, and includes the Programmer Fast Track for the first several atoms (Summary 1) that I described above. Summary 2 is not in the first 100 pages, but I think you will have enough information to see if this approach works for you. The print book is now available to order, if you’re interested, but try the download first so that you’ll see if this is a book that appeals to you before you buy it. Also, if you would prefer the Kindle version, we’re working on it, and we are planning for that to become available in 1-2 months.

Let us know what you think!

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Atomic Scala book update

Atomic Scala is now “in production,” which means we’re building the index and finalizing the cover and making editing passes and creating other support elements so we can actually go to press in a month or so. We’ll stay with print-on-demand for the time being because we’re still learning things and want the freedom to make improvements. This book is also an attempt to adjust to the way that people actually learn and to make that learning experience better — this makes it more of a continuous experiment. For example, a few weeks ago my coauthor and I gave a one-day tutorial at a conference, and we came away realizing that experienced programmers needed a couple of summary chapters that they could jump to; this way the book can serve both beginning programmers and experienced programmers. So we came back and wrote those, and now the book is better. We expect this experience will be repeated as we gain more information about how people learn from the book.

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