Scala as a new library for Java?

A few weeks ago, an interesting blog post appeared, written by Graham Lea. He posited that there was a new library available for Java programmers and that the thought that folks should check it out. He went on to describe some compelling features, such as:

  • Improved Collections
  • Less boilerplate
  • Extensive pattern matching
  • Automatic property mechanisms
  • Integrates with your existing code
  • And more (read the article)

And then he exposes that he’s talking about Scala. Brilliant! I love it because he addresses concerns that we often hear in the Java community like, “My programmers don’t know it” and “The code will look different” and “Finding enough programmers that know it”, but compares these challenges to those encountered when adopting a new framework (which folks seem to accept).

It’s worth a read and worth your consideration. We may be preaching to the converted here (you *are* reading the Atomic Scala blog, after all), but maybe you’re trying to figure out how to get Scala accepted as one of your “approved languages” or how to talk about using Scala with other team members. Let us know what you think! And definitely let Graham know too!

Print Friendly
Bookmark and Share
This entry was posted in Programming and tagged , , by Dianne Marsh. Bookmark the permalink.

About Dianne Marsh

Dianne Marsh is the Director of Engineering for Cloud Tools at Netflix. Her expertise in software programming and technology includes manufacturing, genomics decision support and real-time processing applications. Dianne started her professional career using C and has enjoyed using many languages, including C++, Java, and C# since then, and is currently having a lot of fun using Scala. Dianne is a member of the Women Presidents Organization (http://www.womenpresidentsorg.com) and a board member of the Ann Arbor Hands on Museum. Dianne has helped to organize CodeMash (http://codemash.org), an all-volunteer developer conference focused on bringing together programmers of various programming languages to learn from one another, and has been a board member of the Ann Arbor Hands on Museum. She is active with the local user groups, including hosting several. She earned her Master of Science degree in computer science from Michigan Technological University. She's married to her best friend, has two fun young children and she talked Bruce into doing this book.

Comments are closed.