Programmer Fast Track in Atomic Scala

We wrote Atomic Scala to appeal to beginning programmers as well as experienced programmers who have been frustrated with the sharp learning curve often described when learning Scala. In the atom “How to Use This Book”, we encourage experienced programmers to move through the material more quickly by skipping to the summaries (Summary 1 and Summary 2). Those summaries also help beginners by reinforcing the information that we previously presented in detailed atoms and with additional exercises.

If you previously downloaded the free sample, go ahead and grab another copy. The first 100 pages of the book (free download) has now been updated, and includes the Programmer Fast Track for the first several atoms (Summary 1) that I described above. Summary 2 is not in the first 100 pages, but I think you will have enough information to see if this approach works for you. The print book is now available to order, if you’re interested, but try the download first so that you’ll see if this is a book that appeals to you before you buy it. Also, if you would prefer the Kindle version, we’re working on it, and we are planning for that to become available in 1-2 months.

Let us know what you think!

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About Dianne Marsh

Dianne Marsh is the Director of Engineering for Cloud Tools at Netflix. Her expertise in software programming and technology includes manufacturing, genomics decision support and real-time processing applications. Dianne started her professional career using C and has enjoyed using many languages, including C++, Java, and C# since then, and is currently having a lot of fun using Scala. Dianne is a member of the Women Presidents Organization (http://www.womenpresidentsorg.com) and a board member of the Ann Arbor Hands on Museum. Dianne has helped to organize CodeMash (http://codemash.org), an all-volunteer developer conference focused on bringing together programmers of various programming languages to learn from one another, and has been a board member of the Ann Arbor Hands on Museum. She is active with the local user groups, including hosting several. She earned her Master of Science degree in computer science from Michigan Technological University. She's married to her best friend, has two fun young children and she talked Bruce into doing this book.

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